Rhodes v. Stewart

488 U. S. 1

October 17, 1988

Two prisoners sued to get magazines in prison. By the time the suit was decided, one prisoner was dead and the other had been paroled. Nonetheless, the living plaintiff sought to get attorneys fees under section 1988 as the prevailing party. The government argued that he could not be the prevailing party since the case was effectively moot and he had obtained effectively no relief.

The Supreme Court agreed that no 1988 fees could be awarded in a 6-3 per curiam decision. With reference to Hewitt v. Helms, the Court stated that declaratory judgment does not make you a prevailing party if you obtain no actual relief regarding your original complaint. As the plaintiff was out of prison, he got nothing by winning his court case. Marshall dissented because of his steadfast belief that the Court should never make summary judgment rulings. Blackmun, joined by Brennan, disagreed with the majority’s reading of Hewitt. Blackmun said that the ex-prisoner was still literally a prevailing party, even if he obtained no real relief for winning.

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