Lockhart v. Nelson

488 U. S. 33

November 14, 1988

Criminals could be sentenced to extra time if they could be proved ‘habitual offenders’ by the introduction of four prior convictions. Four prior convictions were offered for burglar Johnny Lee Nelson, but it was later discovered that one of those convictions had been pardoned by Governor Orval Faubus. Nelson argued that he could not be retried because of the Double Jeopardy clause. A case called Burks v. United States held that Double Jeopardy applied when a sentence was overturned on the basis of insufficient evidence. The government argued that introducing the pardoned conviction was a simple trial error, and that the rule against Double Jeopardy for insufficient evidence did not apply.

The Court held 6-3 that introducing the pardoned conviction was a trial error, and that a new trial was possible. Rehnquist stated that Burks was about protecting suspects when the government had totally failed to prove its case in the original trial. Here, a seemingly valid conviction had been introduced at trial, and Nelson’s sentence was later overturned because that conviction’s admission was in error. Rehnquist said that simple errors in admission of evidence were not the same as a simple lack of evidence, erroneous or not. He thus allowed the government to retry Nelson, and introduce four valid prior convictions.

Marshall, joined by Brennan and Blackmun, dissented. Marshall stressed that pardons totally expunge the conviction. Thus, the admission of that conviction into evidence was effectively like admitting a blank piece of paper into evidence. That, he contended, would certainly be a simple instance of insufficient evidence. The government needed to produce four prior convictions, and they produced only three. Marshall also complained that the majority was hasty and conclusory in its opinion, quite in contrast to the careful consideration usually found in the Court’s other Double Jeopardy cases.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s