Coy v. Iowa

487 U. S. 1012

June 29, 1988

In cases of alleged sexual assault against children, Iowa allowed a screen to be put up in a courtroom when the children testified. It allowed the accused to see the children, but not the other way around. One defendant argued that the screen placement violated his confrontation clause rights – it literally took away his ability to confront the witness face to face. Iowa responded that face to face confrontation was not a core guarantee of the clause, and that it was justified by the need to protect deeply traumatized child victims.

The Court ruled 6-2 that the screen violated the confrontation clause (Kennedy did not participate). Scalia waxed poetic about the ineffable value of having to make an accusation to someone’s face, and how it would be helpful in letting the jury assess witness credibility. He found that this face to face confrontation was, in fact, a core central value of the Sixth Amendment that the state could not so easily escape with its vague contention that some child victims will be traumatized by seeing their abuser. He remanded the case for harmless error analysis.

O’Connor, joined by White, concurred, and noted that Iowa might use alternative methods of protecting child witnesses like closed circuit television. She also said that the presumption of a face to face right could be overcome in extreme cases for an especially traumatized witness. Blackmun, joined by Rehnquist, dissented. Reviewing precedents, he found no basis for concluding that face to face confrontation was a core value of the Sixth Amendment. He noted that protecting terrified child witnesses was a compelling interest, and observed that the screen actually burdened it far less than the admission of hearsay evidence under various hearsay exceptions. He also slapped down an argument not reached by the majority that the screen would cause the jury to draw an inference of guilt.

 

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