Riley v. National Federation of Blind of N. C., Inc.

487 U. S. 781

June 29, 1988

To discourage charity fraud, North Carolina passed a law that placed tiered limits on how much professional solicitors for charitable donations could keep for themselves as a fee. These limits could be rebutted. The law also required solicitors to state to potential donors the percentage of money they had left to charities within the past year. Finally, it required these professionals to be licensed before engaging in any solicitation. All these provisions were challenged as impeding the First Amendment rights of both the charities and the solicitors.

The Supreme Court struck down the licensing requirement 6-3, and the other restrictions 7-2. Brennan cited precedents that had ruled flat restrictions on fees out of order. Although the North Carolina law was more flexible, it was still not flexible enough, and it justification of limiting solicitors to ‘reasonable’ fees demonstrated a paternal belief that the government knew better than the charities themselves. Brennan easily found that the compelled speech of telling donors up front about percentages retained and turned over would burden the collection of funds by scaring away both potential donors and solicitors. Finally, because the stat could potentially hold up indefinitely the licensing of unpopular solicitors, he found the licensing requirement unsound as well. In all cases, the charity’s ability to communicate to the public through its own chosen means was impinged upon.

Scalia concurred in all but a footnote which signaled approval of a hypothetical legal requirement that a solicitor merely disclose his professional status. Stevens concurred in all but the licensing part, feeling that states could be trusted to conduct licensing in a fair manner. Rehnquist, joined by O’Connor, dissented. He felt that the tiered restrictions, complete with the possibility of rebuttal, were nuanced enough to be considered narrowly tailored to. The licensing requirement no more implicated free speech than the requirement that legal defendants retain licensed lawyers. Finally, Rehnquist did not feel that a brief disclosure about charity financing by a solicitor would unduly burden fundraising efforts.

I’m not sure about the fee limits, or the licensing requirements, but I think the compelled disclosure is clearly unconstitutional. If I joined nothing else, I would have joined Brennan’s section on that.

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