Frisby v. Schultz

487 U. S. 474

June 27, 1988

A large group of pro-life activists peacefully picketed the home of an abortion doctor for several days, until the town passed an ordinance to ban residential picketing. The ordinance was passed with the expressed intent of protecting people in their homes from unwanted psychological harassment. The pro-life activist sued to have this ban struck down by the First Amendment. They argued in a facial challenge that it was overbroad, not narrowly tailored, and not written in service of a compelling interest.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that the ordinance could survive a facial challenge. O’Connor once again slapped down an especially asinine justiciability argument, and moved to the merits. Because it targeted speech on the public fora of roads and sidewalks, the ordinance would have to meet strict scrutiny. Lower courts said the ban was content neutral, and O’Connor interpreted the statute to ban only picketing in front of a single residence, and not mobile picketing throughout an entire residential area. So interpreted, the ban was not overbroad, and O’Connor found that protecting people in their home from unwanted messages was a compelling interest. And because the Court construed the ban to only apply to picketing at a single house, O’Connor felt the ordinance was narrowly tailored to meet the harm it purported to address.

White, concurring in judgment, did not like how the majority unilaterally interpreted the ordinance to not apply to mobile picketing throughout a larger residential vicinity. He thought the ordinance might have a broader reach, but ultimately felt that it was still barely within the limits of constitutionality. Stevens, dissenting, felt the ordinance was overbroad becaue it could, literally read, forbid a kid from holding a sign that said “GET WELL CHARLIE – OUR TEAM NEEDS YOU.” Brennan, joined by Marshall, did not think the ordinance was narrowly tailored. If the state wished to protect people in homes from being harassed, it could allow some picketing, but limit the crowd size, time duration, and noise level. That would serve the compelling interest while suppressing the least amount of speech.

This is, without a doubt, the worst abortion ruling ever made by a conservative majority. O’Connor’s opinion has some shocking language that I can hardly believe Scalia joined. She charged the pro-life activists with behaving in “an especially offensive way.” She was horrified by the “devastating effect” the picketing had on “the quiet enjoyment of the home.” Furthermore, she contended that “the offensive and disturbing nature” of the behavior “could scarcely be questioned.”

Evil loves darkness and hates light because it loves to stay hidden, and hates exposure. The brave pro-life activists were piercing the darkness and exposing evil when they picketed the doctor’s house. The town had a right to know of the serial murderer in its midst, and of his quiet life free from any legal trouble. An intense spotlight was shone on the banality of evil. The town council, loving darkness, and hating the light, twisted justice, and passed an ordinance to silence the latter day prophets. The lonely voices crying in the wilderness were made lonelier still.

Let’s be clear – if you’re a doctor who murders babies, you have no right to complain of emotional trauma and harassment when a light is shone on your demonic barbarity. When you have so much blood on your hands, you have forfeited the right to comfort and peace in your home. God detests nations that spill innocent blood.

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