Torres v. Oakland Scavenger Co.

487 U. S. 312

June 24, 1988

Jose Torres was one of 16 people who was appealing a District Court ruling. Unfortunately, due to clerical error, his name was left off the list of people in the formal appeal. The Appeals Court refused to allow him to be part of the case, reasoning that without formal notice of appeal, it quite simply had no jurisdiction pertaining to him. Torres countered that the appeal rules were not meant to penalize minor errors and technicalities.

The Supreme Court left Torres high and dry in an 8-1 ruling. Marshall said that appeal rules should be interpreted liberally, but that this liberality could not be extended to instances where no jurisdiction existed. Without his name in the official appeal, a court could simply offer Torres no cognizance. Scalia, concurring in judgment, didn’t even like Marshall’s assertion that any spirit of liberality should animate application of the rules.

Brennan waged a lonely dissent. Rather than sum it up, I’ll quote the final paragraph. “After today’s ruling, appellees will be able to capitalize on mere clerical errors and secure the dismissal of unnamed appellants no matter how meritorious the appellant’s claims and no matter how obvious the appellant’s intention to seek appellate review, and courts of appeals will be powerless to correct even the most manifest of resulting injustices. The Court identifies no policy supporting, let alone requiring, this harsh rule, which I believe is patently inconsistent not only with the liberal spirit underlying the Federal Rules, but with Rule 2’s express authorization permitting courts of appeals to forgive noncompliance where good cause for such forgiveness¬†is shown. Instead, the Court simply announces by fiat that the omission of a party’s name from a notice of appeal can never serve the function of notice, thereby converting what is in essence a factual question into an inflexible rule of convenience.”

All right, NOW I’m mad at the majority in Houston. If you’re going to be activist about jurisdiction, at least be consistent about it. Worse yet, Brennan makes a great case that pleading the case of Jose Torres wasn’t even activism, but just what the law demanded. I myself would have joined Brennan’s opinion. Torres got screwed over badly, and if a majority of the Justices were going to press the case of Houston, they should have pressed his case too.

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